The river Temarc, in winter.
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Poetry

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A poem, written by Robert Poston in 1921

When You Meet a Member of the Ku Klux Klan

When you meet a member of the Ku Klux Klan / Walk right up and hit him like a natural man;

Take no thought of babies he may have at home / Sympathy`s defamed when used upon his dome.

Hit him in the mouth and push his face right in / Knock him down a flight of stairs and pick him up again.

Get your distance from him and then take a running start / Hit him brother, hit him, and please hit the scoundrel hard.

Pour some water on him, bring him back to life once more / Think of how he did your folks in the days of long ago;

Make a prayer to heaven for the strength to do the job, / Kick him in the stomach, he, a low, unworthy snob.

Call your wife and baby out to see you have some fun, / Sic your bulldog on him for to see the rascal run

Head him off before he gets ten paces from your door, / Take a bat of sturdy oak and knock him down once more.

This time you may leave him where he wallows in the sand / A spent and humble member of the Ku Klux Klan.

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glenniebun
58 days ago
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CT USA
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Floppy Guidance

jwz
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glenniebun
234 days ago
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Burning floppies was sooooo fun, though. The plastic would melt while still burning, sending little fireballs to the ground. Note: for outside enjoyment only; I'm pretty sure the fumes were toxic.
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1 public comment
StunGod
234 days ago
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I miss Beagle Brothers.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth

AMAZING

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This weekend, Melissa McCarthy reprised her role as White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Saturday Night Live for the cold open, and it was, of course, amaaaaazing.

Video Description: Melissa McCarthy, outfitted as Sean Spicer, complete with ill-fitting suit, gives a press conference. She starts by promising to be calm and cut back on the gum, then immediately is not calm and chews massive amounts of gum. She can't pronounce names of foreign dignitaries, finally saying, "You know what? Let's just call her Connie." She then takes questions, and again responds by freaking out, eventually turning to dolls to demonstrate her point, in the process confessing the immigration ban is rank racism. She reads a list of imaginary terrorist attacks, and then accuses Nordstrom of terrorism, showing that she's wearing an Ivanka bangle and high-heeled shoes. She introduces Jeff Sessions, played by Kate McKinnon, who says, "There are two kinds of crime: Regular and Black," before being hussled off the stage. McCarthy's Spicer then uses a leaf blower on a reporter to shut her up, before chasing reporters around the room on her podium, used like a Segway. "Live from New York, it's Saturday night!"
Now, that was pretty great, but, my friends, THEN THERE WAS THIS.

Video Description: An SNL digital short, featuring Leslie Jones on a quest to play Donald Trump. She studies Trump's speech and mannerisms. She blows off her boyfriend to do her Trump research. She's outfitted in a Trump wig and eyebrows, even as people tell her it will never happen. She goes to see producer Lorne Michaels and does a terrible Trump impression. He tells her it's not going to happen, then she explodes on Lorne, in a very Trumpian way. She is escorted out. On the street, still in costume, she looks forlorn. Then Melania pulls up in a limo, mistaking her for Trump, and she gets in and they drive away.
Sometimes, dreams really do come true.

Donald Trump has managed to restrain himself from tweeting about SNL recently. But of course we know that he can't look away, and that all of it is getting under his thin skin: "More than being lampooned as a press secretary who makes up facts, it was Spicer's portrayal by a woman that was most problematic in the president's eyes, according to sources close to him."

Keep it up, ladies of SNL. Keep it up.
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glenniebun
284 days ago
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Y'all, the Ghostbusters are coming to save us.
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Who's Style is That? Louis XIV or Donald Trump? An Interior Design Guide to the New President

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Who's Style is That? Louis XIV or Donald Trump? An Interior Design Guide to the New President:

BONUS POST: McMansion Hell on Donald Trump

Y’all knew it was coming. And now, may all your dreams come true. 

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glenniebun
307 days ago
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CT USA
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Moral Action in Trump’s America

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I’m way deep in a big project, and rather significantly behind on it too, so my blogging for the next few months is going to be quick-hit stuff rather than anything thought through.  I’ll try to make up for that by making it as regular a practice as I can to toss good reads your way.

Todays comes from Masha Gessen, someone y’all know I greatly admire.  About a week ago she posted a piece on The New York Review of Books site.  In it, she asks if the realist stance in politics can function in the context of Trump.  To find out, she looks to her own family history — including choices she made — to answer no.  She takes no prisoners:

In Bialystok ghetto, my great-grandfather’s responsibility in the Judenrat was to ensure that the ghetto was supplied with food. He ran the trucks that brought food in and took garbage out, he ran the canteen and supervised the community gardens that a group of young socialists planted. He also discouraged the young socialists from trying to organize a resistance movement: it would be of no use and would only jeopardize the ghetto’s inhabitants. It took him almost two years to change his mind about the resistance efforts, as he slowly lost hope that the Judenrat, by generally following the rules and keeping the ghetto inhabitants in line, would be able to save at least some of them.

As in other ghettos, the Judenrat was ultimately given the task of compiling the lists of Jews to be “liquidated.” The Bialystok Judenrat accepted the job, and there is every indication that my great-grandfather took part in the process. The arguments in defense of producing the list, in Bialystok and elsewhere, were pragmatic: the killing was going to occur anyway; by cooperating, the Judenrat could try to reduce the number of people the Nazis were planning to kill (in Bialystok, this worked, though in the end the ghetto, like all other ghettos, was “liquidated”); by compiling the lists, the Judenrat could prevent random killing, instead choosing to sacrifice those who were already near death from disease or starvation. These were strong arguments. There is always a strong argument.

But what if the Jews had refused to cooperate?

640px-le_brun_charles_-_horatius_cocles_defending_the_bridge_-_google_art_project

Was Arendt right that fewer people might have died? Was Trunk right that Judenrat activities had no effect on the final outcome? Or would mass murder of Jews have occurred earlier if Jews had refused to manage their own existence in the ghetto? We cannot know for certain, any more than we can know now whether a scorched-earth strategy or the strategy of compromise would more effectively mitigate Trumpism. But that does not mean that a choice—the right choice—is impossible. It only means that we are asking the wrong question.

The right question…or better, the right stance, the right scale on which to weigh any choice of action?

We cannot know what political strategy, if any, can be effective in containing, rather than abetting, the threat that a Trump administration now poses to some of our most fundamental democratic principles. But we can know what is right. What separates Americans in 2016 from Europeans in the 1940s and 1950s is a little bit of historical time but a whole lot of historical knowledge….

Armed with that knowledge, or burdened with that legacy, we have a slight chance of making better choices. As Trump torpedoes into the presidency, we need to shift from realist to moral reasoning. That would mean, at minimum, thinking about the right thing to do, now and in the imaginable future. It is also a good idea to have a trusted friend capable of reminding you when you are about to lose your sense of right and wrong.

I’m convinced Gessen is correct.  More, I believe her demand that we make the moral choice first, and then pursue whatever particular tactic seems most likely to embody that choice, will be the most effective, as well as the right thing to do.  A Democratic response to Trump that says we can make this work a little better enshrines Trumpism, and all the vicious GOP assumptions as the ground on which such matters get decided.  One that says “No. This is wrong.  Democrats will oppose, not mitigate…” is the one that creates a real choice going forward on the ground on which we want to fight.

Read the whole thing.

Image: Charles Le Brun, Horatius Cocles Defending the Bridgec. 1642/3 (I know it’s not dead on point, but it’s close, and I always loved the story, so there.)

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glenniebun
352 days ago
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neil-gaiman: bookdates: So this is happening on Twitter. And...

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neil-gaiman:

bookdates:

So this is happening on Twitter. And it’s the cutest thing I’ve ever seen.

tfw you realise you spent an evening flirting with a dictionary.

I think this is my fetish

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glenniebun
391 days ago
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